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How to be more age-positive (why we’re all anti-anti-ageing now)

— by Alyson Walsh

Photo: Claire Pepper

We’re all anti-anti-ageing now. Thanks to bloggers, influencers and savvy consumers of a certain vintage, there has been a much-needed shift in attitudes towards ageing. Last year, one of America’s biggest beauty magazines Allure announced that it was going to stop using the term anti-ageing. “Whether we know it or not, we’re subtly reinforcing the message that aging is a condition we need to battle”, said Michelle Lee in her editor’s letter for the September issue. Spot on. Just like the images we see in magazines and online, the language we use to describe products is important, too.

This shift away from the fashion and beauty industries’ long-standing obsession with youth, to a position more accepting of the ageing process, has brought about a rise in inclusivity. Older models and muses such as Daphne Selfe (who turned 90 this year), Jan de Villeneuve (72) and Lauren Hutton (73) are busier than ever. Having recently returned to modelling in her 50s, London-based Mouchette Bell told me, “It’s a new beginning for me, I feel very excited – and modelling at this age feels much better, I’m more comfortable with it now. I hope that my experience means I have something to give – and that I can encourage other people. I don’t mind being older; I’m proud I’ve got this far.”

The prominence of the over-50s is fantastic – there is a power that comes from this increased visibility of older women who are proud of their age and act as role models for the younger generation. I think it’s incredibly important for younger women to see that we don’t want our wrinkles (and life experience) airbrushed out of the picture; we are confident and comfortable and at ease with how we look.

It’s not about age, it’s about mindset.

 

Me and Davina at a Ryvita #GetMore event this summer

As Ryvita ambassador Davina McCall has said: “I was pretty much certain that 50 was going to be the end. I was going to be boring, not fun, a little bit broken, irrelevant. But I don’t think that’s true of women anymore. I am refusing to fit that stereotype.” Ageing is not what it used to be. We have improved lifestyles and take more care of ourselves, today; we want to look healthy, radiant and modern – and that does not equate with looking younger. “What gets me out of bed”, Davina continues, “and keeps me motivated on the exercise-front is how it makes me feel about myself. I look strong and I feel strong.”

Now that’s the kind of language we can all relate to.

 

 

 

This is a sponsored post. Ryvita has teamed up with Alyson Walsh to be part of their Positivity Panel alongside Davina McCall. The panellists were handpicked to help inspire women across the nation to feel confident and happy, whatever their age, through advice, tips and tricks.

Head to https://www.ryvita.co.uk/living-well to find out more.

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We’re all anti-anti-ageing now. Thanks to bloggers, influencers and savvy consumers of a certain vintage, there has been a much-needed shift in attitudes towards ageing.